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Bassist on how band will approach classic 1987 album onstage, when to expect upcoming studio LP

By Andy Greene, Rolling Stone

Thirty years ago, the wild success of The Joshua Tree transformed U2 into the biggest band on the planet. Radio hits "With or Without You," "I Still Haven't Found What I'm Looking For" and "Where The Streets Have No Name" catapulted them from arenas into stadiums and found then hobnobbing with Frank Sinatra, appearing on the cover of Time magazine and sharing the stage with Bob Dylan, Bruce Springsteen and B.B. King. "Certainly looking back on playing the tour at that time, it should have been an extraordinarily, freeing, joyful opportunity," says bassist Adam Clayton. "But it was actually quite a tough time trying to deliver those songs under the pressure of growing from an arena act to a stadium act. I, for one, don't remember enjoying it very much."

He'll probably enjoy it more this summer when U2 take The Joshua Tree on a victory lap three decades down the line. "I think this summer run is almost an opportunity to take it back," he says, "and look at those songs and look at what was going on then and see where we are now." We spoke to Clayton about the impetus for the tour, how the show will be structured, if fans can expect to hear rarities and what's happening with Songs of Experience.

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Guitarist also reveals status of band's upcoming 'Songs of Experience' LP and discusses rare songs fans might get to hear live

By Andy Greene, Rolling Stone

Since their formation in 1976, U2 have aggressively avoided any move that even hints at nostalgia. But this year they're going to finally look back by taking their 1987 masterpiece The Joshua Tree on tour in stadiums across America and Europe in honor of the album's 30th anniversary. It's a chance for the band to re-connect with fans after the rather disappointing reception to their 2014 LP Songs of Innocence, and it gives them a chance to hit the road while continuing to put the finishing touches on their upcoming album Songs of Experience. A couple of weeks before the shows were formally announced, U2 guitarist the Edge phoned up Rolling Stone to talk about the tour, reviving rare songs onstage, their next album, Donald Trump and much more.

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Check out Adam Clayton's interview on St. Patrick's University's pop-up station: Walk in My Shoes Radio. Adam appears around the 1:08:50 mark in the 2 hour radio show and talks for about 10 minutes. The radio station in Dublin will only be in existence until this Friday, the 14th!

Clayton discussed his passion for running (as opposed to using treadmills), as well as his thoughts on mental wellness and his history with substances:

"There is nothing that I miss about drugs and alcohol that a sober life hasn't given me ten fold. I love my life now."

Regarding new album plans, Adam dropped a few hints at what is happening in the studio. He said:

"We've been working on a record and we've been humming and hawing on whether it's finished or not. We've decided it's not finished -- we're going to work up until Christmas. I wish we were a little bit more definite about our scheduling because people have been expecting it. But it'll be out next year -- maybe March/April. That's the plan, but I'm not confirming it."

Adam was also no fan of Donald Trump when he said:

"He seems to be a very strange man."

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U2 guitarist The Edge talks about the Paris concert broadcast on HBO, security concerns, and the new album

by Melinda Newman, Billboard

On Dec. 7, U2 took the stage at Paris' Accorhotels Arena to make good for the second of its two shows originally postponed in the wake of the Nov. 13 terrorist attacks in the city that left 130 dead, including 89 at the Bataclan concert venue where Eagles of Death Metal were playing.

The concert, U2: Innocence + Experience Live in Paris, captured live for HBO by director Hamish Hamilton, was a breathing testament to the healing power of music, not only for the audience, but for U2 as well. "It sort of felt like it was part of a process of reclaiming live rock and roll in the city of Paris," says U2 guitarist The Edge in an exclusive interview. "We were by no means the first event post the Paris attacks, but for us it was very symbolic and very significant. We tried to get back as quickly as we could."

U2 invited the Eagles of Death Metal to join them on stage, marking the first time the California band had played since the attacks. "They were robbed of their stage, so we would like to offer them ours," U2 frontman Bono told the audience.

Calling from the studio where U2 is working on the follow-up to 2014's Songs of Innocence, The Edge talked to Billboard about that Paris night, increasing security following recent events such as the Christina Grimmie murder and the Orlando club massacre, as well as the new album and a possible new tour.

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